The Early Bird …

January 1, 2014 at 12:16 pm Leave a comment

… has its feeding patterns affected by light and heat pollution during cold winter mornings.  Is this true?

This is what the forthcoming Early Bird Survey will investigate.

Breakfast time for Robin by fintbo, on Flickr

Breakfast time for Robin by fintbo, on Flickr

Birds require extra energy to keep warm, especially during long winter nights. To cope, they lay down extra fat reserves, though small birds quite often only lay down enough for a single night. Longer nights not only affect the amount of energy a bird uses, they also reduce the amount of time that birds can feed in. Birds, therefore, have to make the most of the daylight hours to replenish their energy reserves before it gets dark.

Building on observations from the Shortest Day Survey, the Early Bird Survey will investigate what effect, if any, light and heat pollution have on the feeding patterns of birds during a cold winter’s morning.

The  survey takes place on 9 January 2014 (submissions from days between the 6 and 12 January will be welcome too) and requires people to get up just before dawn, watch their garden feeding stations and record what time they see the first 10 different species arriving; some additional information on the local environment will also be recorded.

Can you take part in this survey?

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