Garden Gold

November 8, 2015 at 5:00 pm 1 comment

The BTO has just launched a winter Goldfinch Feeding Survey. With 70% more Garden BirdWatchers reporting Goldfinches now than 20 years ago, it’s apparent that they are now common garden visitors but we don’t fully understand the reasons behind this rise in numbers.

The survey will help  investigate the factors behind this increase, as well as uncover their winter feeding habits. It will also support new research being undertaken by BTO Research Ecologist Kate Plummer, to investigate whether the increasing use of garden bird foods by Goldfinches is helping their national population to grow. Kate recently led on the Blackcap work funded by the GBW Appeal that showed that supplementary feeding has affected the migratory behaviour of wintering Blackcaps in the UK.

Goldfinch (RSPB Images)

Goldfinch (RSPB Images)

The survey is running between now and the end of February, so please take part if you have Goldfinches in your garden – you don’t need to be feeding them. All the details about what we’re looking for and how to take part can be found here: www.bto.org/goldfinch-survey.

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Entry filed under: surveys. Tags: , , , , .

The 2014 BTO Nest Record Scheme Season in Glamorgan New Pochard Survey – Winter 2015-16

1 Comment Add your own

  • 1. Wayne  |  November 9, 2015 at 10:29 am

    This week, our Goldfinches are feeding on sunflower hearts and ignoring nyjer. Notably, they are also feeding on wild buddleia in an adjacent property.

    Reply

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